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We Are Project Retail.

We are retail workers in the Washington, D.C. area. We are building a movement that is reflective of all needs and demands of local retail workers. We will educate, agitate, and take direct action until we win everything that we deem necessary to thrive as retail workers.

We are demanding secure living wages, access to affordable and safe public transportation, ideal working and living conditions, living wages, and free and fair opportunities to organize our workplaces.

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The Latest

Brian’s Story: Fighting For Worker Rights

Brian’s Story: Fighting For Worker Rights

I made the decision to return as a member of project retail because I’ve been in several situations where I’ve been fired for being the voice of reason for the team, my hours were taking a beating, and to help fight against wage theft and unfair and poor management.

Department Of Employment Services Oversight Hearing Happened On February 27, 2019

Department Of Employment Services Oversight Hearing Happened On February 27, 2019

As a former retail worker I can ensure you that normal practices of retail stores make it difficult for workers to spot wage theft such as clocking you out for lunch while you restock, clocking you out at closing but having you remain to clean the store, and having your hours moved to the next week in order to avoid paying you overtime.

WORK IN RETAIL? KNOW YOUR RIGHTS UNDER D.C. LAW

D.C. Minimum Wage

The minimum wage in Washington, D.C. is $13.25. On July 1, 2019 it will go up again to $14.00. Check your pay stubs!
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Reporting Time

Your employer must pay you for at least four hours of work every time you come to work (if you are not regularly scheduled to work less than four hours) – even if you come to work and are sent home or you are given a shift less than four hours long.

Waiting Time

Your employer must pay you for any time you spend waiting on your boss to arrive to work. If you spend time on work premises waiting for your boss to arrive after your shift has already begun, you must be paid for that time.

Work Time

Your employer must pay you for any time you spend working, including time spent at training required by your employer, traveling for work (other than commuting), and repair, maintenance and cleanup activities at work.

Paid Sick Leave

Your employer must provide you paid sick leave. Employers with 100 or more employees must provide each employee at least one hour of paid leave for every 37 hours worked, capped at 56 hours of leave per year. You can use your sick leave to stay home sick, get services related to domestic violence, go to a doctor’s appointment, or take care of a sick family member.

Poverty wages combined with high rent cost and very few opportunities have caused retail workers across the district to live in a constant state of struggle. We’ve had Enough!

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